How to measure content marketing success with metrics that matter

 

What are the metrics that matter for content marketing success? This is a question I get asked often. It’s important to know your goals before you start measuring, or else you’ll end up with an overwhelming list of irrelevant numbers. In this blog post I’m going to share some of the most important metrics for content marketing success and how to measure them.

how to measure content marketing success with metrics that matter

This article will help you measure your efforts in engaging potential customers through content marketing, by focusing on content marketing metrics key metrics.

Quality Score or Clickthrough Rate (CTR)

Quality score is the amount of people who click on links from your site compared to those who don’t.

How much traffic do you get from your content marketing campaign? If it is a long-term goal, this number might not be indicative of the success or failure of your strategy in that short amount of time. Instead consider how many people are engaging with and sharing your content after they have read it.

What actions do they take? How does their behavior change over time?

The number of conversions generated by certain types of pages on our site (eCommerce) The bounce rate for specific pieces may also indicate when we have failed to execute an effective piece but don’t despair – remember there’s always room for improvement!

how to measure content marketing success with metrics that matter

Some things just work better than others so if one page isn’t performing well, try focusing efforts elsewhere until you find what works.

The amount of time a visitor spends on your site.

This number is calculated by comparing the duration between when a person enters and exits your website. Visitors who stay longer must have found something they like!

An increase in this metric can be an indication that people are finding what they’re looking for, staying engaged with it, and perhaps considering purchasing or subscribing to something new – all good things from our perspective! This can also tell us if we’ve been successful at keeping up with the content which users want to see most often (in case you were thinking about laying off writing a little bit).

We recommend tracking bounce rate as well since it will show how many viewers exit immediately after landing on certain pages without clicking through anywhere else within the site.

The number of subscriptions to your email list, free trial signups for software products, or any other conversion goal you might have in mind.

how to measure content marketing success with metrics that matter

This is one particular metric which has jumped out at us as important over the past twelve months. While it may seem like obvious advice when blogging about content marketing success, so much effort goes into attracting new visitors that we sometimes take them for granted and forget just how valuable they are!

There’s no shortcut around this though folks – if people aren’t subscribing to an offer there must be a good reason why not (perhaps the offer isn’t right for them? Or perhaps our landing page copy isn’t persuasive enough?). If you haven’t been successful on this front lately don’t despair: try focusing on the content which users want to see most often and make sure you’re tracking it properly.

A number or percentage indicating how many people have subscribed, given a positive response (e.g., completed a form), or opted-in for something related to your blog’s topic.

The more emails we get from our visitors – especially those who take action by subscribing – the better! Having this information lets us know that there is strong interest in learning more about what we write about so let’s keep writing awesome stuff!

You can use tools like Google Analytics free email reporting feature to do all of these things (like tracking referral traffic etc.) quickly and easily without needing any extra software installed onto your site. Just remember: if no one takes an active step forward it might be time to re-evaluate the way you’re promoting your blog’s content.

How many people are engaging with and sharing your content after they have read it.  The more social media shares, comments, likes ,and general buzz around a piece of content – all positive signs that we’ve done our job well!

As always though this is another number which can never tell us everything so don’t forget about bounce rate (see above). If someone lands on one page within your site but immediately exits without clicking anywhere else then perhaps there was something wrong with how it appeared or what information it contained?

Make sure these issues are followed up upon ASAP before visitors get turned off from visiting again in the future. The other thing to keep in mind here is that these numbers are only relevant for your blog posts. Anything else (e.g., images, infographics, videos) should be tracked separately!

The number of views each piece has received in aggregate across all platforms/locations where it’s been published or shared.

This particular metric tells us whether people like what we’re sharing enough to pay attention and share with their friends too – something important when advertising on social media and for brand awareness.

We recommend splitting this one up into separate columns so you can see how often visitors are engaged after arriving via different sources: Google search , Twitter , Facebook etc. The more unique visits the better since there’s less risk our content will become irrelevant if everyone stops talking about it once they’ve seen it already

 

– Website traffic –

This is the number of visitors coming from different sources every month .

This particular metric tells us whether people like what we’re sharing enough to pay attention and share with their friends too – something important when advertising on social media .

We recommend splitting this one up into separate columns so you can see how often visitors are engaged after arriving via different sources: Google search , Twitter , Facebook etc.. The more unique visits the better since there’s less risk our content will become irrelevant if everyone stops talking about it once they’ve seen it already.

– Number of leads –

Number of leads is the number of visitors who take the next step on your website .

This is where landing pages are essential to measuring content marketing success. You want people to read what you have to say, but inevitably they’ll come away with more questions than answers.

They may also be looking for some new knowledge that makes them consider doing business with you instead of one of your competitors . This can be measured by using a lead capture form (with its own unique URL) somewhere in an article like this and tracking how many opt into giving their contact information for follow up communications or sending them product samples etc.

It’s also important not only the quality/kinds of leads generated, but whether it converted sales revenue too.

Social media interactions

The number of likes, shares , retweets and re-pins your content receives .

This particular metric is a great way to measure how many people are reading what you post. Likes show up pretty prominently on social media which means that users will likely come across it even if they don’t actually click into the blog itself.

This has been shown to be an important factor in ranking high organically for keywords since Google’s algorithms can use these signals as part of their evaluation process (and this information was recently made public by one of the company’s employees!) This should go without saying, but we’ll mention again.

It also shows us whether our subject matter resonates with readers or not! These metrics give us some insight about how people feel when they see our content. We can infer that if nobody is sharing it means there’s no real interest in what we’re saying and therefore might be better placed elsewhere on the website or not at all.

– Social media reach –

The number of unique individuals reached by your social media posts .

This shows us how many people are exposed to every post (or retweets etc.) which gives you a good idea about how well received each message was, even if they didn’t interact with them themselves. It also helps show whether some platforms were more effective than others since social networks have different sizes/populations associated with their users’ accounts too!

There isn’t much point reaching out to 100k Twitter followers for example, if most of them are outside the target demographic.

– Number of backlinks –

The number of links to your website on other sites .

It’s no secret that more credible sources link out to popular pages or websites, especially when it comes to B2B industries. At this point in time Google seems less concerned about how many incoming links you have compared with their initial search algorithm updates some years ago (which were designed specifically to combat spammy SEO tactics) but they still matter since webmasters can use these metrics as an easy way to measure content marketing performance in terms of quality and authority.

If a reputable news publication has linked out we know users will find value in reading our original content too! That said, too many links can look like spam and affect your content performance.

It’s important to balance links out with great writing since that will help increase the number of natural inbound/outbound links overall!

– Number of new customers acquired via website .

The number or percentage increase in sales revenue generated from leads that came from your website  .

This is a key indicator of the success of all content marketing efforts since it shows us whether our posts are moving people along the buying cycle towards converting into actual customers. This will obviously differ depending on what industry you’re in, but for most businesses this metric is incredibly important if they want to stay afloat long-term!

Any time we can bring organic traffic back to our site that means there’s an opportunity for them to be captured and potentially converted into paying clients or visitors who might then share their experience with others too.

Unfortunately there isn’t really any other way than just checking these numbers manually (and comparing against previous reports) although Google Analytics does have some helpful conversion metrics built right in so take advantage of those if you have the time!

– Bounce rate

The percentage of visitors that visit just one page or leave your site immediately after arriving .

This tells us how many people are landing on our website and only looking at a single piece of content (or none at all) before leaving. A high bounce rate can be indicative of several problems including lack of engaging/entertaining content.

Too much text in an image, heavy post, vague headline etc. It’s important to learn from these examples when tracking down what is causing this issue for each individual blog post.

You can also use engagement metrics to find out what is causing the bounce rate. It could be there isn’t enough internal linking between posts either which means users aren’t finding other useful pages when they’re navigating around your site – but again the root cause might be a different issue entirely!

– Form Fill Rate

The percentage of visitors who fill out your contact form  .

This is one way to measure whether our content has been useful enough for users in order to get them from the top of the funnel all the way down into signing up as potential customers or newsletter subscribers.

Some blogs are more focused on lead generation goals than others, but it’s important that we can clearly see where they’re coming from and what kind of value they bring us so we know if they’re worth pursuing further or not!

You’ll also want to look at which posts have generated these leads too since this will help you figure out which topics/titles appeal most to your target audience – perhaps there are some that are worth exploring further?

– Time spent on page

A measurement of how long users spend reading each blog post .

This is another useful metric for figuring out which posts tend to create the most engagement with our target audience. If they’re spending more time on a particular piece than others, then it obviously means there’s something about this article (or set of images) that makes them want to explore everything in more detail.

Even after a first glance they weren’t sure what it was all about! This can give us insight into whether or not we’ve chosen an engaging topic/headline for this specific piece. If not, changes might need to be made so as not to repeat past mistakes.

On the other hand though, it can also be a sign that we’ve written too much and need to split this content up into multiple posts instead – something you should definitely consider doing when faced with this problem! Once again, Google Analytics and Google search console have some helpful conversion metrics for us here which you might want to take advantage of in order to get the most out of your data.

– Number of shares on social media

The number or percentage increase in sales revenue generated from leads that came from non-website sources .

This is another key indicator which tells us if our blog posts could be driving traffic back towards our site via other means like Facebook/Twitter etc., and how effective these efforts have been (compared against previous reports). The more people share each post, the higher the chance of new visitors finding it organically which means more potential customers/newsletter subscribers etc. for us.

However, don’t forget that you might also need to look into other ways these shares are happening since not all social media channels are created equal! For example, if our blog is primarily aimed at readers who use Pinterest then we’re obviously going to see a greater number of re-pins than likes on Facebook.

Keep this in mind when interpreting each individual metric – they often tell different stories about what’s working and where your content marketing program focus needs to be too. If things aren’t looking quite as good as previous reports though, there could be several reasons why including lower quality posts with images that simply reflect news or otherwise fail to stand out.

– Brand Sentiment –

An analysis that calculates the overall positivity or negativity associated with your brand name  .

This tells us how people are talking about your brand online in the wake of any recent changes you might have made – whether they’re related to our blog or not. It’s another useful way for brands with multiple social media channels (and websites) to get an idea of which parts of their company are working best and where they need most attention.

Even if it takes a bit more digging around than some other metrics! For example, we can use Google Trends here in order to see what search queries lead users most often back towards our site but also keep track of specific types like “positive” or “negative”. We’ll then be able target these pages whenever new posts go live so that readers know straight away if this particular piece will help or hinder them depending on their own personal needs.

– Number of Comments

The number of comments that readers have left with their feedback which includes any questions they might be asking .

– Conversion Rate –

The percentage of visitors who complete a desired action, e.g., make a purchase, sign up for an email list or download something  .

how to measure content marketing success with metrics that matter

This is the most important metric to keep track of the sales funnel because it tells us whether or not our content marketing strategy as a whole is actually working.

It highlights where we need to be focusing more attention too. For example, if there’s no one commenting on any of our blog posts then this could indicate that they’re either failing to stand out from the crowd, lack clarity or are missing something else which is preventing readers from engaging.

On the other hand though if our posts are performing well but there’s no one sharing them then this means that either they’re not actually reaching an audience who will find it useful or aren’t being presented in a way that makes people want to share too.

 

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– Number of Leads

The number of new contacts / people who have signed up to receive our products or services .

This is another extremely important metric because it’s what actually drives revenue in the long run. For example, if we see that blog content converts well but social media isn’t helping us attract any leads then this could mean that our posts are being presented in the wrong way.

It could also mean that posts aren’t appealing to people who would actually be interested. On the other hand if it’s social media that does well but blog content isn’t generating any leads then this could indicate that we’re not really reaching out to an audience which has a real interest in what we have on offer , or that our blog posts are failing to convert.

– Popular Keywords

The most searched for keywords related to our products or services .

This is another extremely important metric because it tells us exactly what people are already searching for, which gives us a good idea of where we should be focusing more attention when it comes to content creation too. For example, if we see that a particular blog post is performing well but doesn’t have any keywords in it then this means that the topic itself wasn’t actually very popular to begin with which means our content might not attract as much attention from potential customers in the future.

On the other hand though if posts aren’t converting at all and show up  for popular keywords then this means that you’re actually targeting the wrong audience, or your blog content doesn’t really offer anything of value to them.

– ROI (Return on Investment) –

How much you earned compared to how much was invested into your content  marketing efforts .It is paramount for content marketers to measure content marketing roi, in order to calculate conversions.

how to measure content marketing success with metrics that matter

– Cost Per Mille (CPM)

The average cost it takes to get 1000 exposures of your content marketing message via social media channels .

This is another extremely important metric because it helps us to understand whether or not our content marketing activities are actually making a return on investment.

For example, if we see that our blog posts convert well but social media isn’t helping to generate any leads then this could mean that the content is appealing to our target demographic but we need to work more on promoting it, or that the content isn’t really reaching out to them in the first place. On the other hand though if it’s social media that does well but blog content isn’t generating any leads then this could indicate that we’re not targeting the correct audience, or our blog posts aren’t converting.

Conclusion

In essence, this blog post highlights how measuring content marketing success can be difficult at times – there are many different things that matter and they all seem critical in some way or another. The most important thing however was not listed because it is a combination of the rest – you have to measure your content marketing with metrics that really matter in order for it to be successful.

Writing these things down will help keep them in mind and ensure that time, energy, effort etc. are not wasted on anything but what really matters.

Get the best Content Marketing professionals

The best way to succeed with your content marketing is to make sure you know what metrics matter most. Write down what matters and track it carefully with the help of our professional content creators and content marketers.

Contact us

Email: content@writers-access.com

Phone no: +1 231 760 82000.

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